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The Resource Rising tide : the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America, John M. Barry

Rising tide : the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America, John M. Barry

Label
Rising tide : the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America
Title
Rising tide
Title remainder
the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America
Statement of responsibility
John M. Barry
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • In 1927, the Mississippi River swept across an area roughly equal in size to Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont combined, leaving water as deep as thirty feet on the land stretching from Illinois and Missouri south to the Gulf of Mexico. Close to a million people - in a nation of 120 million - were forced out of their homes. Some estimates place the death toll in the thousands. The Red Cross fed nearly 700,000 refugees for months. Rising Tide is the story of this forgotten event, the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known. But it is not simply a tale of disaster. The flood transformed part of the nation and had a major cultural and political impact on the rest. Rising Tide is an American epic about science, race, honor, politics, and society
  • Rising Tide begins in the nineteenth century, when the first serious attempts to control the river began. The story focuses on engineers James Eads and Andrew Humphreys, who hated each other. Out of the collision of their personalities and their theories came a compromise river policy that would lead to the disaster of the 1927 flood yet would also allow the cultivation of the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta and create wealth and aristocracy, as well as a whole culture. In the end, the flood had indeed changed the face of America, leading to the most comprehensive legislation the government had ever enacted, touching the entire Mississippi valley from Pennsylvania to Montana. In its aftermath was laid the foundation for the New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt
Summary
In 1927, the Mississippi River swept across an area roughly equal in size to Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont combined, leaving water as deep as thirty feet on the land stretching from Illinois and Missouri south to the Gulf of Mexico. Close to a million people -- in a nation of 120 million -- were forced out of their homes. Some estimates place the death toll in the thousands. The Red Cross fed nearly 700,000 refugees for months. Rising Tide tells how the flood changed the face of American and laid the groundwork for the New Deal
Tone
Writing style
Award
New York Times Notable Book, 1997
Awards note
Lillian Smith Book Award, 1997
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
156713
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
977/.03
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
F354
LC item number
.B47 1997
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/lexile
1120
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Target audience
adult
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America
Label
Rising tide : the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America, John M. Barry
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 481-496) and index
Control code
41898
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
524 p.
Isbn
9780684810461
Lccn
96040077
Other physical details
ill., map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocm36029662
  • (OCoLC)36029662
Label
Rising tide : the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and how it changed America, John M. Barry
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 481-496) and index
Control code
41898
Dimensions
25 cm.
Extent
524 p.
Isbn
9780684810461
Lccn
96040077
Other physical details
ill., map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocm36029662
  • (OCoLC)36029662

Library Locations

    • Waycross-Ware County Public LibraryBorrow it
      401 Lee Ave, Waycross, GA, 31501-3000, US
      31.207899 -82.353897

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